A 3D printing update for you

Manufacturing Materials that Can Be 3D Printed

3D printing entails building objects in three-dimension from a computer-aided design (CAD). In the printing process where sophisticated forms of printing are used, the material is added successively layer by layer. This is the reason why 3D printing is also referred to as additive manufacturing.

Many processes like presses, hammering and casting are involved in conventional manufacturing. But with 3D printing, materials are added in layers, hence making it more convenient to create objects as compared to manufacturing them conventionally.

It is only a matter of time and 3D printing will replace traditional manufacturing and assembly of products. With 3D printing, it is possible to get industrial prototypes and final products with utmost precision.

3D printing is synonymous to speed and optimisation in that objects are made in record time with efficiency and in a tidy working space, as opposed to traditional forms of manufacturing.

This process entails fusing of molecules and powder grains layer after the other. The layers are then solidified under computer control, resulting in a three-dimension product. Companies like Geomiq can even complete your project in 3 days.

Mobile telephony, aerospace and automotive industries are among those that have adopted this new form of production to create parts and crucial component. It ensures that parts are replaced, modernised and upgraded with new functionalities and components.

Some of the advantages of printing products in 3D over manufacturing them traditionally are as follows:

  • 3D printing is useful in training and consulting experts for new products and projects.
  • It helps in surveying and digitizing real parts.
  • It helps in remodelling and re-engineering.
  • It helps in faster production of prototypes in new inventions before mass production.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUfUxTUXYZk

All spheres of life require 3D printing and have already started reaping the benefits. For instance, the medical world is about to revolutionize organ transplant by availing some of these body parts through 3D printing. Parts like skin, limbs and kidneys are now available thanks to 3D printing.

Even the new space technologies are utilizing 3D printing such as Stargate’s Terran 1, the world’s 1st 3D printed rocket. Stargate’s patented technology gives way for an entirely new chain that made Terran1 possible.

Complex geometries can be fabricated as well quickly, in a reliable manner, and with lots of flexibility, regardless of the size. 3D printing comes with the benefit of low operational costs as compared to conventional manufacturing processes, which are typically expensive.

When one invests in an effective and affordable 3D printing solution, they are assured low-cost production and efficiency.

Statutory requirements and improved conditions of work coupled with customer satisfaction and changing trends and designs are all guaranteed by the use of additive manufacturing.

In addition, it is possible to redesign old data from drawings or even artefacts. To do this, you will first have to convert the old data to CAD data to provide the raw material for 3D printing. Once that is done, you will be able to create the exact product as the old one.

3D printing, however, requires a bit of conventional manufacturing to finish printed objects either by the assembly, milling and cutting by use of machines before getting the final product.

Physical projects are converted into digital models through 3D laser scanning, which allows quick and accurate capture of shape and geometrics. This provides a digital form to be used in the additive manufacturing process.

Image link: https://www.laserdesign.com/3d-scanning-parts-objects

This improved invention of paper printing is very resource-efficient by the fact that it has minimal or no waste at all as compared to conventional manufacturing. This automatically makes it cost-effective.

Contrary to traditional supply chains which would rely on the efficiencies of mass production and require many assembly workers, 3D printing requires very little work.

Additive manufacturing, however, has its shortcomings, especially when it goes past the prototyping stage.

One disadvantage is that, unlike traditional modes of manufacturing which recreate products with high speed, additive manufacturing is slower. This is because every product has to be produced in layers and the process has to be repeated for all the parts which may take hours.

The use of specific materials also requires different models of 3D printers which are specifically designed for those materials. A lot more innovations are required in 3D printing because some materials still can’t be worked on a 3D printer such as metal alloys owing to their high melting points.

Research and innovation are, however, ongoing to make advanced inventions of 3D printers. This could only mean that the future holds a lot about additive manufacturing.

Conclusion

3D printing is creating new possibilities in many fields. The process is quite fast and accurate, and that allows people to create prototypes easily before mass production. 3D printing or additive printing is quite efficient and cost-effective.

Next Generation 3D Superstars

One of the great things we like to do here at 3D Filaprint is to promote 3D Printing throughout schools in our local area.

Over the last year we have worked with some fantastically creative students and helped them gain an insight into 3D Printing. As well has having fun all our students gained experience and knowledge helping them take 3D Printing into the wider business environment. We like to think that we have given them just a little spark of what can be achieved in the future of 3D Technology. More about that in our 3D Medical Blog.

What makes us even more proud is to see just how much our part in working with Career Ready has helped towards creating new life chances for the next generation.

Sarah Morton of Career Ready sent us this message of thanks.

Thank you for giving your time over the past year to help young people prepare for work. Working together, we have achieved a great deal over the past year, helping almost 7,000 students prepare for work.

Research shows that adults who recall four or more engagements with an employer while at school, are five times less likely to be NEET (Not in Employment Education or Training) and earned, on average, 16% more than peers who recalled no such activities (research by Dr Anthony Mann, Director of Research and Policy, Education and Employers Taskforce).

Your efforts have contributed to changing life chances.

We have created an infographic to say Thank You. This was created by Fraser McKay, a Career Ready student who joined the team this summer.

On behalf of all the Career Ready team and our partners in schools,

THANK YOU

Thank you Sarah for giving us the opportunity to help a little.

We have recently run an afternoon workshop event introducing final year students to 3D Design and Printing.

Next is a presentation to 3rd year students with Dr Kholoud Mohseen of the Essex University.  Details of the event will be posted at the end of October 2017.

Tim Kay told Filablog

The afternoon session was a triumph the students loved it – we have three more planned in the near future.

Watch this space……Next is a presentation to 3rd year students with Dr Kholoud Mohseen of the Essex University.  Details of the event will be posted at the end of October 2017.

#3deducation #3dgeneration #love3d

Richard Grant’s Practical Success with Our Skyblue PLA

Richard Grant works globally and in the UK delivering difficult tech and creative projects for Film studios, artists and private clients. He  is a Disruptor and Innovator. Loving to Hack, make and produce. This includes mentoring and making useful and incredible connections. His LinkedIn profile and IMDB reads like a Who’s Who of inspiring and creative projects spanning the last 20 years.

Working from his studio Near Windsor, West of London, he runs “rgproduct” and @FuseDeep as a Freelance Creative Director.

Richard innovates in many areas and most recently in 3Dprinting. Constantly developing and creating ideas for multiple industries. Richard has been honing his 3D skills and has worked on some notable projects such as an LED lit, oil matrix lightweight nodal structure for BP, which was suspended above delegates heads at a corporate event, and a fully working scissor lift, modeled from scratch to hold a £1M present.

You can find all these projects on his LinkedIn Profile.

Recently Richard used our Skyblue PLA to create further the development of @FuseDeep, his large and strong 3Dprinter 1700x400x500mm

     

We spoke to Richard and asked him what it was in particular he loved about working with 3D Filaprint products?

When did you first become aware of us and how did you find out about 3D Filaprint?

Around 3 years ago I was looking for a good, reliable, high quality British supplier with a fast delivery service. I searched the web and found 3D Filaprint. Since then I have built a great relationship with Tim and his team.

How have you found our service and products?

I’ve been combining fine art with high tech design to create some amazing pieces. Tim is like my #3Dprint Filament R & D department and always has time to discuss pro’s and con’s of using particular materials. If I have a particular project and am not sure about how the material might respond to the need (for use with one of my MakerGearM2s) I know that I can call Tim, discuss a project with him and he will usually have some great advice for me. We often chat to develop ideas, it is a two way street.

What do you like best about our service and products?

The two way conversation I have with Tim.  It’s not just a sale, it’s about building a community of knowledge. He spends time with customers and because of his knowledge of the industry and it’s fast paced developments and products he’s great to discuss ideas with.

    

Tell us more about the use of the Skyblue PLA in your last project. What did you make and why? Did you design it yourself or use a template?

The parts were created from scratch to enable the creation of my very special 3Dprinter. It is special as it uses polymer slide bearings so can be used in most environments.This followed on from a collaboration with the German company IGUS, worldwide manufacturer and distributor of plastic plain bearings, spherical bearings, linear guides, cable carriers and continuous-flex cables.  Using the gantry as the focus of the project I created a plethora of parts for a 3D printer build project. Use PLA as it’s safe to print and quick and easy to use.

How long did it take to print?

I iterate and apply constantly, since commissioning the gantry and chassis I have taken me about 3 weeks to get from gantry and chassis to 80% complete, which was about 10 – 15 days solid work.  I was able to run the project faster as one of my MakerGearM2 printers has been engineered to run faster.

      

What other projects are you running using 3D Filaprint filament?

Many of my projects use filament supplied by Tim. There are lots and very varied applications!

What advice would you give to children and young people who are at school and would be interested in pursuing a similar career?

Get good at 3D modelling, understand the use of tools and your hands and combine 3D technology with traditional understanding.

Thank you to Richard Grant for taking the time to speak to us briefly about #3Dprojects, #3Dcommunity and #3DFilaprint.

You can find out more about Richard online:-

If you need some inspiration take a browse through the amazing filaments we have in our store on our filament guide. You can also give our team a call for more advice 01702 611027.